Information on teen dating violence

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In a 2011 national study of over 15,000 high school students, 9.4% self-reported they had been physically harmed by their partner and 8% of students had been forced to have sex in the previous 12 months Teens frequently communicate with one another through cell phones, email, and social media sites.Since technology provides quick, constant access to people, it is often used as a tool for abuse and a means to establish power and control that is easier to hide than physical violence and verbal assaults.A recent study showed that one in four teens in a relationship has been harassed or insulted by their partner via cell phone, Since most technology requires passwords and access codes, teens can easily hide technology-based abuse from their parents, despite how frequently it can occur.

Below you’ll find information and tools to help you talk to your kids about healthy relationships, guidelines on how to navigate their world of cell phones and social networking and how to talk to your kids about being an upstander vs. If you suspect your teen may be a victim of abuse, you are the most important resource and advisor for your child.

Dating violence is when one person purposely hurts or scares someone they are dating.

Dating violence happens to people of all races, cultures, incomes, and education levels.

If you need support there are people and resources available to help.

Remind your teen that he or she deserves a violence free relationship and that abuse is NEVER appropriate and NEVER their fault.

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